Mountain resorts: Find your holiday home …
AP, Fox call Arizona for Biden; Trump team…
DJI’s palm-sized Mini 2 drone flies further…
Unboxing The Razer x Pokémon Pikachu…
Research Finds That Weightlifting Has…
Chelsea 3-0 Rennes: Player Ratings as…
Tested: 2021 Mercedes-Benz E450 All-Terrain…
Children in Singapore asked to use new…
Dior Joaillerie’s Tie & Dior High Jewellery…
India reports daily jump of 50,210…
Astronomers have traced mysterious…
Neglect of migrant workers could hurt…
This Delicious Food Will Help You Lose…
Oreos With Red Creme Are On Shelves Fo…
Leicester City vs Braga Preview: How to…
October New Vehicle Sales, Bolstered by…
Send us a tip on a light festival for a chance…
Young ‘Beng’ hawkers to open restaurant at…
Ariel Lin reacts to those who mocked her…
FendiFrenesia: Silvia Venturini Fen…
Virus forces Sydney Mardi Gras parade off…
Get the old Google icons back with this…
All PS5 upgrade games confirmed so far
Aeromexico seeks approval to fire …
Oregon Just Legalized Magic Mushrooms…
This is the easiest side dish to make for…
Damning pictures of “embarrassing” …
See and Hear More of the 2022 Subaru BRZ
The states with and without travel…
Top 7 Dyson Products To Buy During 11.11…
McConaughey ‘hurt’ by mother’s reaction to…
Face masks go high-tech with speech…
Ivory Coast’s Soro calls on military to disobey…
A mission to ‘Mars’ at the HI-SEAS habitat…
Struggling Mexican airline Interjet…
Smalls is a cat food delivery service that…
Diogo Jota’s Liverpool impact: Where does…
Meet Wesley, The Singaporean Man Who Owns A 200-Acre Sheep…
Singapore—One of the issues facing the country this year concerns the country’s foreign workers, as the perception remains that they take away jobs from locals. And because of the economic fallout from the current pandemic, jobs have become an ever-increasingly important matter.
A new article in Nikkei Asia, published on Tuesday (Nov 3), and entitled “Local jobs or global talent? Singapore faces COVID-era conundrum,” looks at the consequences of the possibility of Singapore limiting the number of its foreign workers, whom the country has relied on for its growth and development in the past few decades.
In endeavouring to reserve the best jobs for locals, minimum salaries for professionals and mid-level employees have been raised this year. Nikkei Asia quotes Manpower Minister Josephine Teo saying in a Facebook post, “You may of course adjust your EP or S Pass employees’ salaries upon renewal…But consider the missed opportunities of building up your local employment, and the strong government support to do so.”
Singapore, like other countries, has had to protect local jobs in the age of Covid, which is particularly challenging, given that almost two out of every five people in Singapore is a foreigner. Added to this is the country’s ageing population. In 10 years, around 25 per cent of the population will be age 65 and older.
The question is this, as Nikkei Asia puts it: “If a graying Singapore accepts fewer foreign workers amid reduced interaction with the outside world, can it maintain economic growth?”
The article quotes associate professor of law at Singapore Management University, Eugene Tan, as saying, “We have thrived by having a combination of domestic talent, augmented by foreign expertise.”
Domestic talent must be developed further, experts say. “If employers’ needs and local job seekers’ needs do not match, a tightening of foreign labor rules may not be very effective. The replacement of foreigners with locals should take place in tandem with the growth of relevant human capital,” a Singapore-based economist at Mizuho Bank, Hiromasa Matsuura, told Nikkei Asia.
These sentiments were echoed by a French entrepreneur as well. “We cannot always hire Singaporeans even though we want to. If Singapore makes it harder and harder for foreigners … it might lose its openness and be less attractive for investments or for people. And everybody loses.”
The government, recognizing that foreign talent is still vital for economic growth, has said that at least for now, Singapore must remain open, even as it has boosted efforts to upskill and train the local workforce.
Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong said to Parliament in September,
“Our population is small, it is not growing very fast. Soon it is going to level off. To grow our economy, we have no choice but to top up with foreign workers and work pass holders.” —/TISG