The circuit breaker has deprived us of freedom, security… and romance. This is why dating apps in Singapore have evolved to meet the ongoing demand for love.
In March, Bumble saw a 56 per cent rise in video calls worldwide. Even homegrown brands in Singapore like Kopi Date and Lunch Actually have implemented video call options.
New features are being integrated to encourage users to get a date. While that may mean more unsolicited pictures could pop up on our phones, innovation is always welcome.
Set to launch its own in-app video chats, “Face To Face” in late 2020, even Tinder will be adding video chat to its platform.
The new video feature will require both people to opt-in and promise to keep the call PG. No nudity, sexual content, references to hate speech, violence or illegal activities will be tolerated.
Users will see their screen split in half, and the caller will be able to see their own feed. This allows users to maintain their privacy and prevent unwanted information from being filmed.
Users will then be prompted to answer whether they want to have the call again, and are given the option to report inappropriate activity.
Given that Tinder isn’t exactly known for its family-friendly content, we’re not sure how video-calling is going to fly.
However, Tinder’s parent company Match reported that women increased their average daily swipes by 37 per cent in April. Statistically, things are looking up for men.
New features are also being tested, including a conversational prompt, and an option to share social content to existing matches.
Bumble, a female-centric dating app, just hit its 100 million user mark. Combined with its sister app, Badoo, Bumble’s parent group now controls a base of 600 million users.
In an era of social distancing, Bumble has expanded its distance range past 100 miles to connect with anyone within the Southeast Asian region. We’re looking at you, boys in Malaysia.
Unlike Tinder, Bumble already has an extensive range of options for communication on its platform. That includes audio notes, and video and voice call as well as text chats.
You can even do good as you date. Bumble has pledged to donate US$1 to the World Health Organisation (WHO) Covid-19 Solidarity Fund every time someone adds a “Virtual Dating” badge to their profile.
Dating apps aren’t just releasing new ways for you to communicate, they’re also helping you get more selective about your matches.
OkCupid introduced new features in June that let you set preferences for the potential matches you’ll come across on your feed.
That includes your preferences for smoking, pets, diet and more. Earlier this year, the app also upgraded its Monogamy and Non-Monogamy settings.
To be seen by more people who match your ideal type, all you’ll need to do is complete your profile on OkCupid.
Possibly the most moderate of all dating apps listed in this article, even Coffee Meets Bagel (CMB) users are more willing than ever to try new ways of dating virtually.
Instead of meeting in person, 39 per cent plan to text their matches more, 29 per cent plan to call and 28 per cent want to video chat more.
To support their users, CMB has launched Rolling Chat extensions that allow all chats with active conversations within the past three days to stay open indefinitely.
CMB Community Virtual Meetups are also being organised. Sort of like virtual speed dating, selected users can sign up to join a video chat with around seven fellow members.
In spite of a deadly pandemic, the power of love seems to be triumphing over the petty geographical limitations of social distancing.
And with circuit breakers easing and community cases dropping, it makes to snag your next boo in-app now.
Featured Image Credit: The Verge
The post Playing Cupid Amid COVID-19: How These 4 Dating Apps In S’pore Are Levelling Up Their Game appeared first on Vulcan Post.
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